Aug 21, 2014
256,758 notes

(Source: rhomeporium, via herbalerotica)

Aug 21, 2014
40,427 notes

thefemaletyrant:

I can never not reblog this.

"What is this pink person? It doesn’t have skin"

(via slashemup)

Aug 21, 2014
17,496 notes
theblacksophisticate:

babyhueyyy:

RIP

We’ll remember you, brother, and continue the fight.

theblacksophisticate:

babyhueyyy:

RIP

We’ll remember you, brother, and continue the fight.

(Source: mynaturalsistas)

Aug 20, 2014
5,687 notes
theeclecticnatural:

carshenaclayton:

Michael Jackson was very woke, when I first realized that, I had to listen to all his music again, with a new ear.

Conscious

theeclecticnatural:

carshenaclayton:

Michael Jackson was very woke, when I first realized that, I had to listen to all his music again, with a new ear.

Conscious

(Source: groove-theory, via howtobeterrell)

Aug 20, 2014
72 notes

http://hoodoo-seed.tumblr.com/post/94802256063/thedappledsky-you-say-you-love-african-deities

thedappledsky:

You say you love African deities

And African diasporic practices

You say you love hoodoo- the candles, the oils, the power it brings you

but never once did I hear you say you loved Black people

and very rarely do I ever see you fight for them

I am watching you, I am…

(Source: )

Aug 20, 2014
135,396 notes

blackfashion:

uglyangrygirls:

thevampirequeen:

Civil Rights Movement vs Ferguson Protests

This is terrifying

haunting.

(via diasporicroots)

Aug 20, 2014
146,647 notes
nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:


WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:    Stay with us and keep calm.The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.
Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.
Move us to a quiet place.We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.
Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.
Speak to us in short, simple sentences.
Be predictable. Avoid surprises.
Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.As odd as it sounds, it works.


                                                                                                                 


WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”2. Say, “Calm down.”This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.”Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.



CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!
One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

nothing-rhymes-with-grantaire:

perspicious:

WHAT YOU SHOULD DO:
    
  1. Stay with us and keep calm.
    The last thing we need when we’re panicking, is to have someone else panicking with us.

  2. Offer medicine if we usually take it during an attack.
    You might have to ask whether or not we take medicine- heck, some might not; but please, ask. It really helps.

  3. Move us to a quiet place.
    We need time to think, to breathe. Being surrounded by people isn’t going to help.

  4. Don’t make assumptions about what we need. Ask.
    We’ll tell you what we need. Sometimes; you may have to ask- but never assume.

  5. Speak to us in short, simple sentences.

  6. Be predictable. Avoid surprises.

  7. Help slow our breathing by breathing us or by counting slowly to 10.
    As odd as it sounds, it works.
                                                                                                                 
WHAT YOU SHOULDN’T DO:

1. Say, “You have nothing to be panicked about.”
We know. We know. We know. And because we know we have nothing to be panicked about, we panic even more. When I realize that my anxiety is unfounded, I panic even more because then I feel like I’m not in touch with reality. It’s unsettling. Scary.

Most of the time, a panic attack is irrational. Sometimes they stem from circumstances — a certain couch triggers a bad memory or being on an airplane makes you claustrophobic or a break up causes you to flip your lid — but mostly, the reasons I’m panicking are complex, hard to articulate or simply, unknown. I could tell myself all day that I have no reason to be having a panic attack and I would still be panicking. Sometimes, because I’m a perfectionist, I become even more overwhelmed when I think my behaviour is “unacceptable” (as I often believe it is when I’m panicking). I know it’s all in my mind, but my mind can be a pretty dark and scary place when it gets going.

Alternate suggestion: Say, “I understand you’re upset. It is okay. You have a right to be upset and I am here to help.”


2. Say, “Calm down.”
This reminds me of a MadTV sketch where Bob Newhart plays a therapist who tells his patients to simply “Stop it!” whenever they express anxiety or fear. As a sketch, it’s funny. In real life, it’s one of the worst things you can do to someone having a panic attack. When someone tells me to “stop panicking” or to “calm down,” I just think, “Oh, okay. I haven’t tried that one. Hold on, let me get out a pen and paper and jot that down, you jerk.

Instead of taking action so that they do relax, simply telling a panicking person to “calm down” or “stop it” does nothing. No-thing.

Alternate suggestion: The best thing to do is to listen and support. In order to calm them down without the generalities, counting helps.


3. Say, “I’m just going to leave you alone for a minute.”
Being left alone while panicking makes my heart race even harder. The last thing I want is to be left by myself with my troubled brain. Many of my panic attacks spark from over-thinking and it’s helpful to have another person with me, not only for medical reasons (in case I pass out or need water) but also it’s helpful to have another person around to force me to think about something other than the noise in my head.

Alternate suggestion: It sometimes helps me if the person I’m with distracts me by telling me a story or sings to me. I need to get out of my own head and think about something other than my own panic.


4. Say, “You’re overreacting.”
Here’s the thing: I’m not. Panic attacks might be in my head, but I’m in actual physical pain. If you’d cut open your leg, no one would be telling you you’re overreacting. It’s a common trope in mental health to diminish the feelings or experience of someone suffering from anxiety or panic because there’s no visible physical ailment and because there’s no discernible reason for the person to be having such a strong fear reaction.

The worst thing you can tell someone who is panicking is that they are overreacting.

Alternate suggestion: Treat a panic attack like any other medical emergency. Listen to what the person is telling you. Get them water if they need it. It helps me if someone rubs my back a little. If you’re in over your head, don’t hesitate to call 911 (or whatever the emergency services number is where you are). But please, take the person seriously. Mental health deserves the same respect as physical health.


CREDIT [X]  [X]

This post is important!

One of my girls at camp had a pain-induced panic attack during lunchtime and if it weren’t for posts like this that I see on Tumblr, I might have done something wrong or not known what to do. But because I’d read posts like these, I was able to keep her calm enough that the camp nurse could get her medication to help her and take over when I had to leave to take care of the rest of my cabin.

(via thespeakingspook)

Aug 19, 2014
115 notes

Follow for similar: In the land of Birdsnakes…☼☾♫♥☮☽☼
Follow for similar: In the land of Birdsnakes…☼☾♫♥☮☽☼

(Source: carolinanaturally.blogspot.com, via vintageafrica)

Aug 19, 2014
65 notes
divinemoon:

Warrior Orisha OgunProtect us from tragedies and accidents.Protect us from all evil and harm.Do not permit the iron to hurt us.Be the one in charge Oggun to guard, protect us,And that we have peace.

divinemoon:

Warrior Orisha Ogun
Protect us from tragedies and accidents.
Protect us from all evil and harm.
Do not permit the iron to hurt us.
Be the one in charge Oggun to guard, protect us,
And that we have peace.

(via fogo-av)

Aug 19, 2014
8,301 notes
missauset:

What ima start saying when people be like “what are you?”

missauset:

What ima start saying when people be like “what are you?”

(via slashemup)

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About
What's up its ya boy STINGR aka Chris

a little bit about me hmmmmm

Black*Cis-Male*22 years* PNW Niggas Unite* College Grad* International Public Health* Traditional Medicine* Capoeira* Ifa* Anti-Colonialism* Salvador, Bahia, Brasil (Oi Gente!) * Dread Head* Dancer*Artist *Healer* Scorpio* English (aave) *Portuguese (Bahianese)

umm not much more to say I am a (self-taught) herbalist in training who works at a community garden in the hood and a homeless shelter in the city .

My dream is to be a Medical Anthrolopogist (ask me about it)

and these are the humble musings from my afro I picks.

If you wanna know anything send ya boy a message Subscribe via RSS.